Workplace Racism Persists in Quebec

On Wednesday the parliamentary commission looking into immigration reforms was told by human rights officials that workplace racism persists in Quebec.

Jacques Frémont, president of the Commission des droits de la personne et des droits de la jeunesse, described the discrimination facing immigrants as “systematic and widespread.” He criticized the government for its ambiguous handling of the problem and advocated the introduction of equal opportunity programs.

Jacques Frémont, president of the Commission des droits de la personne et des droits de la jeunesse, described the discrimination facing immigrants as “systematic and widespread.” He criticized the government for its ambiguous handling of the problem and advocated the introduction of equal opportunity programs.

In his testimony Frémont noted that the unemployment rate for immigrants is twice as high as for the rest of population, and three times as high for immigrants who are visible minorities. Studies have also shown that Quebecers with Franco-Quebec names like Simard or Trémblay have a 60% better chance of scoring a job interview than someone named Ahmed or Carlos.

Immigration officials at the hearings are looking for ways to improve the province’s outdated immigration system and make it more competitive. They are looking at models in Australia, New Zealand, and the rest of Canada which are much more efficient.

 

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